The Paris Agreement, also known as the Paris Climate Accord, is a global agreement to combat climate change. It was first adopted in 2015 and has since been ratified by 197 countries, making it one of the most widely supported agreements in history. But who exactly is involved in the Paris Agreement, and what are their roles?

The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) is the international organization responsible for overseeing the implementation of the Paris Agreement. It is made up of 197 member countries, including both developed and developing nations. The UNFCCC is responsible for providing guidance and support to countries as they work to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Each participating country has a Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), which outlines their individual plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The NDCs are updated every five years to reflect new technologies and developments in the fight against climate change. Countries are also required to report on their progress in reducing emissions and adapting to climate change impacts.

The Paris Agreement recognizes that developed countries have historically been the largest emitters of greenhouse gases and have a greater responsibility to take action to combat climate change. Therefore, developed countries are expected to provide financial assistance to developing nations to help them transition to low-carbon economies and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

There are also several non-state actors involved in the Paris Agreement, including businesses, NGOs, and local governments. These actors play a critical role in implementing the agreement at the local level and driving action on climate change from the bottom up.

In conclusion, the Paris Agreement is a truly global effort to combat climate change. It involves 197 countries, all of whom have pledged to take action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The UNFCCC provides guidance and support to countries as they work to implement the agreement, while non-state actors such as businesses and NGOs play a critical role in driving local action. As the world continues to grapple with the effects of climate change, the importance of the Paris Agreement and its signatories cannot be overstated.